A letter that the Scottish Parliament felt unable to publish

Hole Ousia

With careful thought, and backed with full supporting evidence,  I sent the following letter of the 2nd February 2016 to support my petition for a Sunshine Act for Scotland.

The Senior Clerk of the Parliamentary Committee was of the view that this letter did not comply with the Scottish Parliament’s policy on the treatment of written evidence. I was therefore asked to redact significant sections of the letter.

After considerable communications to and fro, I replied as per this e-mail of the 3rd March 2016:

I fully respect the right of the Scottish Parliament to determine 
what it publishes.

I feel very strongly that my letter without the highlighted text 
merely reiterates what I have already said, and fails to provide 
the evidence that I have repeatedly been asked for.

So my position is that I do not wish to amend my letter of the 
1st February on PE1493.

My petition has…

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Mental Health & International Law

Mental Health Cop

When I woke up this morning, I was greated with a familiar message on Twitter from a duty inspector: “We have a male who has been sectioned under 2 MHA but they say there’s no bed.  He’s been here all night and no word of any bed today.  Can they do this and just expect us to lock him up?”  I sent back the hyperlink to a BLOG I wrote three years ago and sent some advice on escalating the incident to senior police officers and trying to do so to senior health managers.  The duty inspector then added that he’d been told there were “no mental health beds in England” and that they were having to try and ensure this guy’s wellbeing whilst knowing perfectly well he should be in hospital. A lot of NHS telephones seemed to be turned off during office hours, from what he reported back…

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24 Hours in Hell: reblog @iamjoannebloggs

Joanne Bloggs

I hardly even know where to start on what happened over the last 24 hours. After voluntarily admitting myself to an acute psychiatric ward, I soon realised it was a frightening and unsafe place, with half-naked people screaming, spitting and shouting throughout the whole ward, and staff doing little to stop them. I’ve been on psychiatric wards before – and yes, there are some extremely ill people in such places – but this was chaos.

I’d arrived at 6pm. I realise there are resourcing issues in the NHS and I realise this was the day of the junior doctors’ strike, but as it happens this ward did not appear understaffed – when I arrived on the ward it had a ratio of 1 staff to 2 patients. What was obvious was a culture of contempt within the staff team for the service and for the patients, with one staff member standing around bragging…

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